audio-face-5404

One of the projects I built for Maker Faire Milwaukee this year was AUDIO FACE [APC-320], which consists of the following things.

  • A cabinet built from scrap wood and plastic found at Milwaukee Makerspace and Brinn Labs
  • An Atari Punk Console that Kathy C. from Milwaukee Makerspace gave me for my birthday (which was already assembled!)
  • A 320 watt car stereo amplifier that someone donated to Milwaukee Makerspace, that I then gave to Jon H. for Disco Dalek, and he then gave back to me a year later
  • A really nice car stereo speaker I got from Andy A. from Milwaukee Makerspace for about $10
  • Some LED lights from Les, a long-time Maker Faire Milwaukee volunteer
  • A hefty 12 volt power supply and a 12v to 9v buck converter, which I purchased from Amazon for about $25
  • Some random arcade button I had lying around, a handful of drywall screws, and probably a few more miscellaneous things I forgot…

audio-face-5033

The concept behind this “noisemaker” is a continuation of what Maks, Dustin, and I did back in 2017, which was a series of devices that made sound when action was taken. Typically this was pressing a button, and often with potentiometers of some kind to alter the sound. I ended up building a lot of Arduino-based sound devices. Are these synths? Maybe… Are they noisemakers? I guess so.

audio-face-4992

When you press the button you are responsible for the creation of the sound. If creating weird noises embarrasses you, you have to deal with that. If you are getting into it and everyone else hates it, it’s on you. Only momentary switches are used so no one can turn them all on and walk away. If you’re there, you’re the cause of the sound.

Many of the devices from 2017 were somewhat fragile, built from small pieces of scrap material, and they sat on a table. For AUDIO FACE [APC-320] I wanted a large cabinet, which was pretty much a requirement due to the large speaker, amp, and power supply. While all of the 2017 devices were extremely cheap (built from scrap, found and scavenged speakers and components, and $3 Arduino boards or ATtiny chips) AUDIO FACE [APC-320] was a bit more expensive, probably costing close to $40 USD.

audio-face-5407

As a sculptural piece, I think AUDIO FACE [APC-320] is interesting because of the contrast. Some of the build material is really nice laminate material or higher quality plywood, but it’s assembled in a slapdash method. There are rough edges that don’t line up, and there’s very roughly drilled holes on each side. While I love precisely designing things, I also love just building with no plans on occasion. Just getting to work and figuring it out as I go. This cabinet is that. At least one person mentioned this at Maker Faire, seeing this as quite a contrast to my other pieces which tend to follow a specific grid or use mathematical concepts. It’s not by accident.

audio-face-5411

One other interesting thing about AUDIO FACE [APC-320] is that it’s sort of a bench. I mean, you can sit on it, and if you dial in the right sound and then sit on the button it makes your insides feel funny. I really like this part and may explore this in the future. I also like the fact that it’s sort of a table or a stool. A weird table or stool with controls in the middle of the top surface that makes noise and vibrates, but still… could be a table or a stool.

timer-2703

I should have known this project was doomed from the start. When I laser cut a piece of paper to test the fit of the components, I somehow managed to flip around the holes for the LED displays, so I ended up building it flipped from what I designed. If that was the only issue, things might have been okay…

timer-2705

Hey, things fit! This was all good (though as mentioned, flipped) and as a front panel it looks fine. Let’s move on to the back of things…

timer-2706

Still good! A few laser cut spacers to get the LED panels flush. The rotary encoders and the outlet are all good. Of course we still need to add wires to get it all connected.

timer-2828

Wires in place. Not bad. I added an Arduino Nano with one of my breakout boards and screw terminals, and there’s a relay module to be controlled by the Arduino. All good.

The idea was that the first encoder would control how many seconds/minutes the outlet was on and receiving power, while the second encoder would control how long the outlet was off or not receiving power. This would allow me to control a 120 VAC device turning it on and off for set amounts of time. (I know, I probably could have used a timer relay, but I wanted to build something.)

Somehow, I never quite got the code to work. Maybe there were some weird issues with the encoder library, or using two encoders, along with the LED panels, I don’t know… but I tried for a few hours to get it to do what I wanted, and it never did. Typically with code issues I bang at it until it works, but for this I just sort of gave up.

In the end it didn’t matter much because I ended up using a variac to lower the voltage instead of togging the full 120 VAC on and off. I also ended up stealing the LED panels and the Nano for another project that had to be done in a hurry. I’ve still got the other parts in place, so who knows? Maybe I’ll return to it in the future…

example-001

I love plotters and plotter art and if you’re into robots or other machines that draw, you should check out #PlotterTwitter and DrawingBots.net

example-002

While I’m still working on my new plotter (which is really an old HP7475A) I figured I’d have fun with Processing and write some code to generate some nice vector art. This is something I do every now and then. I’m someone who believes in writing code for pleasure. Some people are into that… I’m one of them.

example-003

I’ve also released this code in case someone else wants to generate some art for use with their own plotter or whatever device they have that can do something with it. (Like a laser cutter, for instance.) And yes, the sample images you see on the page were generated by the sketch. There are a few variables you can change to adjust things, like the spacing between circles, steps between circles inside of circles, and setting the limit on the smallest circle.

example-004

You can find the code on GitHub under Shape-Grid-Circles. If you do anything cool with it, I’d love to see the results!

clay-makey-06

My experience in ceramics is pretty limited. I took a few classes at UWM, but really didn’t do much outside of school. If I want to blame someone for my renewed interest in clay, it would probably be Bryan Cera. (Though Jeff the Ceramics Area Champion at Milwaukee Makerspace is also a great clay enabler.)

makey-and-cutter

One of the classic maker projects seems to be coasters, and there are many methods of making coasters. I’ve used laser cutting in the past, but I wanted to explore clay, so I modeled a Makey cookie cutter and press and 3D printed them in PLA plastic.

clay-makey-02

Jeff showed me how to use the roller to flatten out the clay to a consistent thickness and gave me some tips on pressing and cutting. (Thanks, Jeff!) I rolled out six of them, some turned out better than others, but I guess they are all unique, right?

clay-makey-03

Jeff gave me the lowdown on what to do next, but sadly he had a trip scheduled that would take him out of town before Maker Faire, which meant I would not be able to fire these before the event. No worries… I know other people who know things.

clay-makey-05

Luckily I work with Bill Pariso at Brinn Labs, and he’s got a Masters Degree in ceramics. I basically said “Bill, I need help!” and he took over and kept an eye on them while they dried out, then got them fired, and glazed, and presented them to me the weekend of Maker Faire Milwaukee. Awesome!

I may experiment more with clay. It’s a very inexpensive material, and I love exploring cheap things for art and making. It allows for a gentle learning curve with low stakes. Also, did I mention how cheap clay is!?

mfmke-si-art

While taking a break from reading through all the applications for Maker Faire Milwaukee I had an idea for some art we could use this year. It ended up becoming shirt art after I shared it with the other event producers.

The art consists of an 8×8 grid with 64 items, yes, as always, I try to make these numbers mean something. 8 bit, 64 bit, you get the idea… The color pallet comes from what we used previously for our kaleidoscope design.

The most difficult part was the typeface. I tried many existing fonts but nothing was working. Makey the Robot is (almost) square, so I needed the letters M, K, and E to be square. Stretching existing fonts did not work, so I ended up creating my own type.

mfmke-si-type

Once I had the M, the E was easy. I just rotated it 90 degrees! The K was a bit more difficult, but the line width matches the parts of the M and E, and I then just aimed for the corners to make them end in 45 degree angles so it would all look even. It’s probably the best “MKE” I’ve ever designed.

mfmke-si-shirt

Here’s a terrible photo of the shirt. We still have some left, so if you want one, let me know, and I’ll get you hooked up for a nice price! (The original design was completely square and did not have the long “Maker Faire Milwaukee” logo on the bottom, but Stacie reminded me we should really add that.)

« Older Entries | Newer Entries »

support:



photos:


buy the button:

Buy The Button