printpi01-browser

It’s hard to believe I’ve been working on “Time Lapse Bot” for almost 10 years… I mean, you’d think I’d be further along by now! ;)

But seriously folks, the Time Lapse Bot project(s) got much better once the Raspberry Pi camera module came along. It allowed for a small, low-cost, portable camera device with great capabilities. I’ve been using a version to monitor my printer at home for quite a while now, and I turned my old PowerBook version into the Milwaukee Makerspace Webcam long ago, but in recent times it’s seen the most use to… monitor prints at the space.

printpi01-setup

So Mark, our 3D Printing Area Champion, asked about building some Pi camera rigs for print monitoring. So I did. I haven’t really built a proper enclosure, or made it very adjustable, but so far it works.

Basically, it captures a photo every minute, which you can see by connecting to the Pi with a web browser while on the network at the space. If you are not at the space, you can visit a web page that will show a new image every five minutes. (There’s a script that does an SCP of the file to a web server.) The other fun thing it does is compile all of yesterday’s images into a time lapse video you can download. Oh yeah, you can browser through old images and videos on the Pi when on the network, though they get deleted after X number of days to save space on the inserted thumb drive.

printpi01-back

Some scrap wood gets it just about at the right height to see the print bed. (Well, we wedged it up a bit… new version coming soon!) I’ve also got a second one in the works, along with a few enhancements I won’t reveal quite yet.

printpi01-mobile

Since there’s no screen on the Pi you need to pull up a browser on a device and check that it’s pointing where you want it pointing. I had a screen working with one of these and then one day it just decided to never work again. Annoying, so that means no screen for now.

And yes, I really do love the Raspberry Pi.

red-matte-box-rail-mount-stl

Many years ago (approximately five) I was using a RED ONE Digital Cinema Camera at my job, and I’d often use digital fabrication to create camera accessories and parts. One of the parts I made was my own version of a RED Matte Box Rail Mount.

I guess I never got around to uploading the file to Thingiverse or Youmagine, but I did have a blog post online since 2014, so I guess it shouldn’t have been too surprising when someone emailed me asking if I could sell them one. Since I 3D print things all the time, I let them know I could certainly print one and send it off to them, which I did.

red-matte-box-rail-mount

I’m glad Sarah is enjoying a cost effective way of holding her matte box in place. If you need something designed and created, let me know… I might have already done it and have the model sitting around waiting to be fabricated again.

stand-01

I’ve found that I prefer firing up OpenSCAD and writing some lines of code to actually trying to sketch simple 3D objects on paper. I grabbed a notepad and thought I could knock out a sketch, but then decided I preferred a model I could spin around and easily edit, and in no time I had what I needed.

stand-02

I’ve found that mocking up cabinets in OpenSCAD works for me. These are not final plans to fabricate something, just quick sketches to communicate ideas with others.

nomcon-map

While I’m sad I’ll be missing NOMCON (the first annual Nation of Makers conference) this year, I’m glad I could still contribute in some way.

nomcon-parts

Dan Schneiderman, one of the leads for Maker Faire Rochester, organized a group to create pieces of a US map that will serve as the stage backdrop for the conference. He sent me the files for pieces to be cut and then we were free to attach whatever we wanted to the front, though there was a color scheme to (try to) adhere to.

nomcon-piece-03

I cut the pieces on the 150 watt laser cutter at Brinn Labs. Since I didn’t have 1/2″ plywood I used 1/4″ Baltic Birch which we then glued together to get the proper thickness.

nomcon-piece-02

I had a few ideas (one involving wax) but ended up cutting up a bunch of old Make magazines (ironic, I know) after carefully selecting purple images that would match the designated color of my piece.

I spray glued all the paper pieces and stuck them down to the wood, overlapping as needed. I then trimmed the pieces that were overhanging the edges, and then applied polyurethane to protect and beautify the surface.

nomcon-piece-01

Here’s my final piece, which is #69. Carl and Kathy H. at Milwaukee Makerspace took care of the rest of the pieces. (Hopefully they got photos of theirs as well!)

I expect to see some photos of Adam Savage and Dale Dougherty standing in front of this!

acrylic-bed

Contrary to what the photo above may suggest, I am not using a laser cut acrylic piece for the Y carriage of my RepRap… What I am using it for is a template to make sure things work properly, and once I’m sure I’ll use it as a drilling template to mount things on the Aluminum Y carriage I have. (Which Frankie gave to me, oh, maybe six years ago!?)

y-plate-metal

Here’s the Aluminum Y carriage. The photo looks weird because it’s from my flatbed scanner. I often scan objects so I can bring them into Inkscape and trace them to get a vector drawing I can work with. (And I had to scan it in two passes and stitch it into one image.)

y-plate-drawing

Here’s the SVG file created in Inkscape by tracing things. Notice I added more holes, which will be used to hold the bearing blocks.

acrylic-fake-bed

It seems to slide pretty smoothly. I mentioned in a previous post, the igus drylin slide bearings want to be under some pressure to work properly, so I adjusted them just right with the blocks I printed and did some slide tests. So far I’m pleased!

Next up will be the holes in the Aluminum. I’m not sure if I should drill and tap for 3mm bolts, or drill for pass-through of 3mm bolts and hold in place with nuts. My thought on the first method is that my alignment via drilling has to be perfect, while with the second method I can adjust just a bit with some slop. Thoughts?

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