posts tagged with the keyword ‘3dprinting’

2019.10.19

dodecahedron-connectors

I honestly can’t remember where I got the idea to make a bunch of dodecahedrons for Maker Faire Milwaukee came from, but I do remember looking at Thingiverse for some connectors I could use with 1/4″ dowel rods. I know I tried Trammell Hudson’s design, since I always admire his work, but I was not using pencils, so it didn’t work. I did attempt to alter his file, but ultimately ended up designing my own file, which worked well enough that I wanted to share it. (Check out Dodecahedron Connectors on YouMagine.)

dodecahedrons-colors-01

So I made nine dodecahedrons that could hang from the ceiling in the Dark Room. And since they’d be in the Dark Room I figured I should use fluorescent filament to create the connectors, and fluorescent paint to paint the wooden dowel rods, and with help from Kathy H. at Milwaukee Makerspace, we got everything painted. Sadly, we did not get the blacklights set up in the Dark Room due to budget constraints, and there was too much light where they were placed, and we had to bundle them all together, and… well, anyway, they turned out great, despite a few issues with presentation.

dodecahedrons-small-01

I’ve also made a smaller (hand-held) model for home. It’s small enough to fit on a 13″ MacBook Pro, though I might hang this one from the ceiling as well. Or maybe make it into a lampshade. I don’t know yet.

dodecahedrons-mms-01

This is the original version, which uses 12″ long, 1/4″ diameter wooden dowel rods. A pack of 100 dowel rods is under $15, and a roll of fluorescent filament is about $22. Since you need 30 dowel rods and 20 connectors per dodecahedron you can easily build three large ones (or a lot of small ones) for under $40 USD as long as you’ve got access to a 3D printer.

Did I mention I really like dodecahedrons?

2019.07.10

red-matte-box-rail-mount-stl

Many years ago (approximately five) I was using a RED ONE Digital Cinema Camera at my job, and I’d often use digital fabrication to create camera accessories and parts. One of the parts I made was my own version of a RED Matte Box Rail Mount.

I guess I never got around to uploading the file to Thingiverse or Youmagine, but I did have a blog post online since 2014, so I guess it shouldn’t have been too surprising when someone emailed me asking if I could sell them one. Since I 3D print things all the time, I let them know I could certainly print one and send it off to them, which I did.

red-matte-box-rail-mount

I’m glad Sarah is enjoying a cost effective way of holding her matte box in place. If you need something designed and created, let me know… I might have already done it and have the model sitting around waiting to be fabricated again.

2019.05.21

omni-wheel-01

I was at a robotics event a while back and saw so many omni wheels I got inspired to try to design one. I remember looking up omni wheels years ago and seeing how expensive they were, so 3D printing my own seemed like an obvious choice.

omni-wheel-model-01

I mostly succeeded in designing and making one, but it’s also quite a bit of a failure. Don’t get me wrong, it was a fun exercise, and I tend to enjoy a design challenge, but these aren’t gonna work.

omni-wheel-03

I had planned on brushing Plasti Dip onto the wheels to give them some grip, or maybe casting them from Silicone. (Someone else suggested printing with TPU filament.) If I get back to this project I might consider some of those ideas…

omni-wheel-model-02

So where was my big mistake? When I modeled this, I did not model in the hardware. Sure, I modeled in the holes for the hardware, and what I thought was enough space for the heads of the bolts, but the bolts stick out just a bit too much. As I said, this was a fun exercise, and maybe I’ll revisit it in the future but…

omni-wheel-02

I went looking for omni wheels again and found this VEX IQ 63mm Omni Wheels (2pk) for about $10, which means for $20 I got 4 really nice omni wheels. They might also serve as a reference if I try redesigning my wheels, now that I have a good example to go from. Maybe my choice of 3mm hardware was a poor one. Hmmm, I’m already thinking about the next iteration.

2019.04.28

mold-05

I made wax balls, and it worked, and I did it using 3D printed molds. I won’t get into why I want/need wax balls in this post, but I swear it has nothing to do with candle making or bath bombs. (These balls are about 12mm in diameter.)

model-02

I originally modeled one ball with one sprue, and then used the loop function of OpenSCAD to make a series of them in a row, slightly overlapping the sprues.

model-01

My original plan was to make silicone molds (like I did with this wax stick) and went as far as creating a positive and a mold box, but along the way I thought about just using a 3D printed mold…

mold-01

Here’s the 3D printed mold created using PLA filament. The holes are for bolting the two pieces together using 3mm hardware. (I used tape in the earlier versions, but it did not work well.)

mold-02

I didn’t need to fill all the bolt holes, but wanted a few options so I could get tight clamping. Wax doesn’t have the same low viscosity of something like water, but when melted is a bit runny, so I just want to make sure I can keep it from leaking out too much.

mold-03

Once the mold is assembled it’s just a matter of melting some wax and pouring it into the mold. I’ve had a few balls with air pockets when demolding, so I’ve taken to sticking a thin piece of wire in to stir around the wax in an attempt to remove the air. (I do have a vacuum pump which I’ve considered trying to use, but the chamber is currently too small to fit much in it.)

mold-04

Hey, wax balls! Originally I tried spraying the mold with mold release, but I don’t think it helped much. What does help is putting the cooled molds into the freezer for a bit (this is a known trick for getting wax candles out of glass jars.) It helps solidify the wax enough to make it come out fairly easily. I do break a few every now and then but a lot less than before I used the freezer method.

The other great thing about using 3D printed molds is that I can very easily (and cheaply) make a whole bunch of molds, which is good, because I may need a few thousand wax balls…

2019.03.23

bracket

As the RepRap build continues, I designed some motor mounts that will work with the 40mm extrusion I’m using. The Nema 17 stepper motors I’m using are about 43mm wide, so they hang just outside the extrusion if centered, so I’ve designed the mount to be slightly off-center so the motor do not hang outside the frame.

mount-rails

I’ve incorporated the model into the overall render of the printer. I don’t have the hole yet for the smooth rod to fit into the mount. I’m looking at models like this one to base my work on.

reprap-6000

I’ve also worked on the full model a bit, and made it slightly larger for reasons I’ll get into in a future post. I’m currently thinking of a few ways to make this machine a bit more flexible in its capabilities, and a larger frame made sense for that. (And it means I can waste less extrusion when I cut it down to size.)

motor

Things look wonky in this photo because that’s actually a piece of 38mm (?) extrusion I had handy, since all the 40mm is at Milwaukee Makerspace right now. I’ve got a few projects to wrap up before we cut down and mill the extrusion, so I’ll probably keep working on the printed parts for a bit.

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