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Fritzing – Breadboard Illustrations

Fritzing is an open-source initiative to support designers, artists, researchers and hobbyists to work creatively with interactive electronics…

Since I’m a n00b who can’t read schematics, the breadboard view is good for me… Lady Ada uses it in some of her tutorials.

So if you’re just getting into Arduino hacking and can’t read/write schematics, give Fritzing a try… you may get something like this:

breadboard

Here’s my first attempt at a breadboard illustration. This is for a sketch that reads data from the photocell, and lights up the LED if it’s too dark in the room. Oh, and if it’s too bright in the room, it makes the piezo buzz. Pretty darn simple. I’m not 100% pleased with my illustration, but it was my first time, and since I’ve built this more than once, I guess it should be considered a success.

The Fritzing site has a list of projects and the application (and web site) encourage you to share your creations (under a Creative Commons license even!)

Oh yeah, as for calling myself a n00b, I took a number of electronics classes when I was in school (which was a long, long time ago) but I’m finally getting back into this stuff, and it’s exciting. More updates to come!

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Skull & Crossbones (and dots!)

Skull & Crossbones (and dots!)

Oh yeah… the license…

Normally I say something like “consider it cc:by” because an Attribution license works just fine by me… but this time, I used a piece of art that was released into the Public Domain (see skull and crossbones large and the legal page for that site.)

OK, so if one piece of this total artwork is in the Public Domain, how do I license the whole piece? Can I use an Attribution license? Should I, or do I need to release it into the Public Domain? Do I use CC0? Now I need to read the CC0 FAQ

For all the work Creative Commons has done to make licensing easier, I still think there’s a long way to go…

(Also, if you have a pile of money lying around, consider donating it to them.)

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BarCampMilwaukee5 Creative Commons Photo Studio Set-up

BarCampMilwaukee5 Creative Commons Photo Studio Set-up

This is the set-up we used, documented. Sam Dodge and I put this together at BarCampMilwaukee5 to take people’s portraits… for free! And that’s free as in beer, free as in speech, and free as in freedom! We let the subject of the photo use the image for ANYTHING they want, and in return, we get to publish it under a Creative Commons license, which also creates this record of people who came to BarCamp. It’s the second time we’ve done this, and this time, we actually planned ahead… well, a little bit.

(See a larger version of the image on Flickr)

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Creative Commons Expert

The thing about posting things on the web is that you’re publishing to a world-wide audience of everyone you know, and everyone you don’t know, and if you happen to include in your slides a photo of someone, there’s a chance that someone who knows that person will see it, and they will probably mention it to that person…

Tweet

nickhacks alerted me that he saw one of my photos… I asked if the presentation he saw it in was available online somewhere, as I wanted to see it as well.

Tweet

He gave me a link, which wasn’t the actual presentation, but gave me enough info to find presentations by the speaker…

SlideShare

And there it is. Slide 108. A photo I created, and published on Flickr with a Creative Commons Attribution, Noncommercial, Share Alike License. It’s a pretty liberal license. It allows people to copy, share, and adapt the work, but it does require that you attribute the work to the creator… you know, give credit to the person who created it. It’s really simple. I even have a nice explanation on my Flickr profile page. So for instance, if you used my photo in a presentation, you might list the attribution part on a “credits” page at the end. This is pretty common in presentations nowadays…

SlideShare

Skip to the end of this specific presentation and the last page presents credits. The only attribution I could find was a blanket “all from whom I borrowed material” which was a little disappointing. But even more disappointing is that right there, on the last slide, on the bottom, is a Creative Commons logo, which licenses the slides under the “Creative Commons Attribution, Noncommercial, Share Alike” license… the very same license my photo was released under.

Did this person provide attribution when using my photo? Not that I could find. Is the photo being used for commercial purposes? Determining Noncommercial use is the most frustrating part of Creative Commons licensing. The presentation the photo is used in is not being sold, and is freely available (under the same license, even!) but does this presentation highlight the presenter as an “expert” in their field (even though it claims not to) which in turn may result in the furthering of this person’s career? Is that “commercial” use in any way? Probably not, but without a lawyer, I’m never quite sure about this… Sadly, it’s probably something only the courts could decide. (At least the Share Alike requirement was met.)

So now the question is… What do I do?

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Faces of BarCamp

I mentioned this project in the post BarCampMilwaukee4 Portraits at MKEDH4 and here it is…. not quite done, but partly done…

Faces of BarCamp

Check out the Faces of BarCamp set on Flickr and let me know what you think…

You want details? Sure… At BarCampMilwaukee4 Sam Dodge and I set up a “Creative Commons Photo Studio” and tried to get portraits of everyone there, with the hope of (a) documenting all the people at the event and (b) providing icon/avatar images for anyone who wanted/needed one. It was a lot of fun for us, as we like taking photos, and we did it quick, quick, quick! We typically grabbed people, took one or two shots, and sent them on their way. We shot with my Nikon D40 with an old manual 50mm prime lens. It was all manual focus, so some are a little softer than I would like, but hey, I think they turned out ok. We had two speedlights with umbrellas, one off to the right up high, and one to the left sort of low… Here’s the set up as seen by the person being shot.

barcampmke4-3
Photo by Sam Dodge

Now here’s the bad new…. I somehow lost a bunch of photos. :( I swear I had them all copied and backed up, but somehow, there’s like 30 of them missing. I believe I can recover some from my memory cards, but I’m at a loss to find all of them. For this, I do apologize, and the only good news I can come up with is that I’m sure we’ll do this again at another event, so keep an eye out for the traveling “Creative Commons Photo Studio” soon!

Also, you should feel free to take the photo of yourself, and use it in any way you so desire, and you are granted full permission to do so… so don’t feel bound by the Creative Commons license it is published under. If you want details on all of this, just ask… And thanks for letting us take your picture!