posts tagged with the keyword ‘electronics’

2019.09.29

timer-2703

I should have known this project was doomed from the start. When I laser cut a piece of paper to test the fit of the components, I somehow managed to flip around the holes for the LED displays, so I ended up building it flipped from what I designed. If that was the only issue, things might have been okay…

timer-2705

Hey, things fit! This was all good (though as mentioned, flipped) and as a front panel it looks fine. Let’s move on to the back of things…

timer-2706

Still good! A few laser cut spacers to get the LED panels flush. The rotary encoders and the outlet are all good. Of course we still need to add wires to get it all connected.

timer-2828

Wires in place. Not bad. I added an Arduino Nano with one of my breakout boards and screw terminals, and there’s a relay module to be controlled by the Arduino. All good.

The idea was that the first encoder would control how many seconds/minutes the outlet was on and receiving power, while the second encoder would control how long the outlet was off or not receiving power. This would allow me to control a 120 VAC device turning it on and off for set amounts of time. (I know, I probably could have used a timer relay, but I wanted to build something.)

Somehow, I never quite got the code to work. Maybe there were some weird issues with the encoder library, or using two encoders, along with the LED panels, I don’t know… but I tried for a few hours to get it to do what I wanted, and it never did. Typically with code issues I bang at it until it works, but for this I just sort of gave up.

In the end it didn’t matter much because I ended up using a variac to lower the voltage instead of togging the full 120 VAC on and off. I also ended up stealing the LED panels and the Nano for another project that had to be done in a hurry. I’ve still got the other parts in place, so who knows? Maybe I’ll return to it in the future…

2018.12.12

Noisemaker from the 1980s4938

I came across a treasure in one of the (many) boxes of “old things” in the basement. What you see is a Radio Shack project box with a speaker and a switch on it. Yeah, it’s a noisemaker, and I built it in the mid-1980s.

Fun fact, I used to do electronics in high school, and while I’m not sure this was a project we did in class, I’m guessing I may have built it around the time I was in school. It was probably around 1985 or so, if I had to guess. (I think I took two years of electronics classes.)

Noisemaker from the 1980s4939

The speaker has a “grill” that appears to be made from a metal screen, maybe from an old scrap window screen? I do know it would have been built with whatever stuff was around the house. I think I used Elmer’s glue to attach the screen to the speaker. It seems to have held up! The lettering for the “ON” label was most likely done using Liquid Paper and there’s a bit of clear Scotch Tape covering it as a protective layer. This also held up well!

Noisemaker from the 1980s4940

There’s a hole in the case. I’m not sure why. If I had to guess, I probably burned it with my soldering iron. I should say “Solder Gun” because at home we had one of these, and I don’t know if it belonged to my dad and I used it, or he bought it for me, but I do remember it wasn’t easy to solder with. At the time I didn’t realize this wasn’t the preferred tool for delicate electronics work…

Noisemaker from the 1980s4942

It looks like the soldering joints on the speaker held up fine… not so much for the masking tape, which dried up and lost its “stick”. I guess I just taped the speaker down, and used the tape as an insulator for the speaker contacts. (I did not know about hot glue yet.)

Noisemaker from the 1980s4945

Let’s pop this sucker open! Solid core wire and a 9 volt battery connector are visible. There’s also a piece of paper that I assumed was to insulate the metal battery housing from the electronics. And then…

Noisemaker from the 1980s4946

I took out the piece of paper and… oh my gawd, I actually documented this thing. There’s a circuit diagram and a Bill of Materials! This explains so much about my life, and honestly, I’m sort of proud of teenage me. Good Job, Petey!

And no, it’s not a proper schematic, but it’s approximately how I document most of my work/projects nowadays, using circuit diagrams, like you might create with Fritzing.

Noisemaker from the 1980s4947

Finally! We’ve got a perf board inside with a few components soldered onto it, and and rudimentary strain relief by running the wires through the mounting holes of the perf board. Well done, Petey!

Noisemaker from the 1980s4949

Let’s flip it over and… oh my gawd, the soldering! Sheesh! Now I am embarrassed! But this does lead me to believe I did this project at home, since that’s where I was using a giant soldering gun and giant solder not quite suitable for delicate electronics. Oh well, at least my soldering skills have improved since the mid-1980s!

Oh, in case you’re wondering how it works, look at the diagram for a clue. You touched the metal bolt sticking through the enclosure and the top metal piece of the enclosure, and you completed the circuit, and could get weird tones based on how much you touched and how hard you pressed. I was really hoping to include a video but sadly, it did not work after 30 years of sitting in a box. Drat!

(And yes, I’m really tempted to build a new version of this to see what it sounds like!)

2018.08.19

pcbway-attiny85-pcb-01

The crew at PCBWay got in touch with me to see if I’d like to try out their service. I’ve used other PCB manufacturers in the past, so I figured I’d give PCBWay a try to see how they worked. The ordering process was not the smoothest, but the boards turned out well, were very affordable, and they got to me pretty quickly.

pcbway-attiny85-pcb-03

I designed this PCB years ago and I’ve used them a lot in my noisemakers and while I might modify them in the future, they are still pretty useful, so I figured I’d make more.

pcbway-001

I had my Gerber files ZIP’d up and ready for upload, so I started the process with PCBWay, which I assumed would be similar to other PCB manufacturers I’ve used. Yup, pretty close. Note that for color you can choose green, red, yellow, blue, white, black, or “none” at the same cost, but choosing purple, matte green or matte black cost bit more. (Not quite double, but more than just a few bucks.) I’m not sure what “none” looks like, but I am curious.

pcbway-003

So I added the boards to my cart, and I first noticed that I could not change the quantity. This was a little annoying, as I wanted to try different quantities to see how it affected the price. You can do that, but only at the first step in the process, at the “Online Quote” step, not once it’s in your cart, so make sure you know how many you want before your add them to your cart!

When I went to checkout I then found out I could not check out. Right, seems my boards were “Subject to audit.” Yes, they had to be approved by someone (a human I guess) before I could order them, which seemed weird. (Notice the yellow highlighting I added to the cart image above.)

pcbway-002

Now, this is partially my fault, as I didn’t see this the first time I uploaded files. There is a little bit of text on the upload form that shows it could take “10min to 1 hours” for approval. I’m not sure exactly how long it took, as I did this late one night and didn’t get an email about approval until the next day. This was the most annoying part of the ordering process. When I want to order something I don’t want to have to wait hours, or even one hour between putting it in my cart and being able to order it. Perhaps they could make it so that you can place your order, and then if not approved for some reason (?) they could refund the order. Or who knows, maybe this whole “approval” thing is due to some new tariff laws. I have no idea.

pcbway-006

Like I said, pricing is good. I got 75 boards for $32. That’s about 43 cents per PCB. These are tiny boards though, so obviously the price per board goes up when you get larger boards. With approval completed (by some human, I guess) I was able to move on to shipping options.

pcbway-007

I went with shipping via DHL, which came in at $21, so the order total for 75 boards ended up being $53, making each board cost approximately 71 cents. (Obviously ordering more would probably bring that price down, but I really doubt I need more than 75 of these right now.)

I uploaded the PCB files on July 21st, and they were approved and ordered by July 22nd. Manufacturing was completed by July 25th and they were then shipped via DHL July 27th and I got them by July 30th. That’s about an 8 day turnaround for these printed circuit boards. (With some weekend days in there.) Not bad! For US shipping DHL is probably the best option for getting them fast. There were two cheap shipping options, one being an ePacket (which seems to be how I get most of my eBay electronics delivered) which was $8 but had a 10 to 15 day delivery time frame. There was also “China Post” option which was $7 but showed 25 to 40 days for delivery. Wow. So the ePacket is not too bad if you do not need your boards in a hurry.

pcbway-attiny85-pcb-02

The boards from PCBWay look good and got to me fast. They were also very affordable. Overall it was a good experience except for the issue of having to wait until files are approved before ordering and not being able to change quantities once the item is in your cart.

2018.06.12

buzz-buzz-2191

BuzzBuzz is a device that makes noise and light using electricity (somewhere around 40,000 volts, approximately.) There are five “high voltage generators” connected to buttons that when pressed cause them to create a spark with a loud “ZAP!” and then continue to make noise (and light) while the button is held down.

buzz-buzz-2192

BuzzBuzz was heavily inspired by something Mario the Maker created. I had one of the high-voltage generators for a while and was planning to do something with it. I had an idea for a project and had started on it, but once I saw this thing I altered my plans.

buzz-buzz-2196

The size of BuzzBuzz was somewhat dictated by the size of materials I had on hand, or could easily get at no cost. The top piece of clear acrylic is from a bulk buy at Midland Plastics where many of the members of Milwaukee Makerspace shop for scrap pieces. Since I had that piece of clear acrylic, it pretty much determined the size of the top of the enclosure.

buzz-buzz-2200

For the walls of the enclosure I grabbed some 16mm thick plywood from the scrap bins at Milwaukee Makerspace. There’s a local tool & die company that donates these pieces to us. They are long and skinny and always have these weird laser cut marking on them, because they use them for calibrating their lasers. I wanted to see if I could cut through the 16mm plywood with the 130 watt laser cutter I have access to. Indeed, it could! At 4mm per second, which is probably the slowest we should cut at. The cuts were not the greatest, but it was more a matter of “Hmmm, will this even work!?” than anything else.

buzz-buzz-2201

You’ll also notice the hexagonal holes on the sides. Those are “sound holes” since my first assembly demonstrated that the box fully closed up was too quiet, so I decided to add holes that the sound could spill out of. It also adds a nice look, and if you associate the “Buzz” in the name with bees, and notice the holes are hexagonal, well, it all fits.

I mounted the AA batteries on the outside so that you can easily see the power source (it’s interesting that 40,000 volts AC can be produced by just 4.5 volts DC) and so that I can easily change batteries without opening the thing. There are two battery packs because one tended to drain too quickly. I may add an AC adapter in the future so that I can convert AC to DC to AC.

(One more fun fact: The battery holders were one of the most problematic parts of this project. I wasted more time trying to get these cheap battery holders to work. The spacing and springs kept making it so the batteries did not make good contact. I started with a 5-pack of battery holders and trashed two of them just trying to modify them to work. Luckily I got two of them working well enough.)

part-3d

I designed and 3D printed the parts that hold down the high-voltage generators and also allow for bolts to be inserted to carry the electricity. (The design of these parts was inspired by the structures that hold overhead power lines.) The bolts can be screwed in or out to adjust the gap, which gives different results for the zap. I started with the narrowest gap and then did the widest gap, and then calculated the three distances in-between. (For the widest gap, you don’t want to go too wide, because if it can’t properly spark, it’ll burn out the unit.)

part-top-view-3d

As you may know, I design 3D objects with OpenSCAD. Once I had my object completed, I did a projection to get what it would look like from a top view. This is the 3D version of that.

part-top-view-2d

I then render it into a 2D version I can export as an SVG file. This allowed me to easily do the layout needed for the laser cut parts.

full-layout-2d

Here’s a top view. The reddish parts will be cut from the top clear acrylic panel and hold the buttons as well as an old SparkFun key switch I had in my parts bin. The grey pieces are for the bottom part of the enclosure which hold the high-voltage generators and the mounts. I ended up printing a full-scale paper version and using it as a template to mark the holes that needed to be drilled. It did not have to be prefect, so close enough was fine.

buzz-buzz-2210

For the construction, there are some screws on the bottom to hold the bottom pieces to the two side pieces, and then the front and rear panels can slide into place and get held in by just one screw on each side. This is not the most elegant, but I realized somewhere along the build process that I did not have a good way to complete assembly or take it apart. This is what I came up with, and it worked well.

buzz-buzz-2205

I used two contrasting stains, for a light and dark look, which I think matched the burned laser cut edges, and allowed for making the inside of the enclosure dark so the zappers could light up the inside.

buzz-buzz-2206

If you’re wondering why there are two rows of buttons, I really liked the symmetry, but I also wanted something I could use when displaying at a table, so that if you’re behind the table talking to someone, you can demo it and press the buttons on your side, and they can try it with the buttons on their side. (In the museum exhibits business we try to make things that are not single used components, so that more than one person can engage with a thing at a time.)

buzz-buzz-2227

While this was a bit of a rush to get done by Bay View Gallery Night, and like most projects, there are things I maybe would have done differently (or at least in a different order) I’m really pleased with how it turned out. I also brought it to Milwaukee Makerspace to show off and got a lot of positive feedback.

Here’s a video showing operation of the BuzzBuzz. It was difficult to capture on file (well, solid state memory) exactly what it looks like, so this is an approximation. You’ll probably want to see it in person to appreciate the full power of this battlestation device.

buzz-buzz-2189

buzz-buzz-2208

2018.02.03

big-switch-little-light-0523

This project started like many of my projects… Someone says something, and I have a reaction to it. I might say something, or I might not say anything, but I’ll get an idea, and decide to do something. Sometimes it’s a ridiculous idea, and that doesn’t really matter. In fact, ridiculous ideas are probably more likely to be explored.

big-switch-little-light-0546

This one started when a local teacher got in touch with Milwaukee Makerspace about donating a bunch of industrial control equipment. Luckily Tom and a few other members were interested enough to go look through nine boxes and transport them back to the space so members could look through them. I should note this is a common thing. When people want to get rid of things we look for a “Champion”. Basically someone who will take responsibility for the stuff. If they bring it to the space we ask that whatever members don’t take “goes away” within a week or so. (Typically this means the dumpster, but not always. At a minimum, some members take some things and divert them from the landfill. Sometimes things are donated to others or recycled.)

big-switch-little-light-0562

This load was a bunch of industrial electronics. Not super useful for most of our members, but many did find some good things. I found some neat switches, and in particular this large switch with a nick “CLUNK!” sound that said it was capable of handling 690 volts…

big-switch-little-light-0540

Steve and I were looking at it as I clicked it on and off and I mentioned how many volts it could handle and he said “Hey, you need to make it turn on an LED!” which was (probably) a joke, since an LED requires roughly 3 volts, which is quite a bit less than 690 volts. (In fact, it’s approximately 687 volts less!)

big-switch-little-light-0548

So I did what I had to do… I had to assemble the switch into a device that could turn on (and off) and LED. I had also found (and destroyed) an old data tape, but I managed to save the nice Aluminum plate that served as the base of the data tape. (Seriously, some of those old tapes were sort of beautiful!) Since I now had to weird objects, I just combined them with some wire, an LED, and LED panel mount, a battery holder, and two AA batteries. The rest is… history!?

big-switch-little-light-0544

There’s also a Sintra plate on the bottom that the battery holder screws into to hold it in place. And some tape, and some hot glue. (It’s not a project until you add the hot glue!)

big-switch-little-light-056A

So yeah, it’s a but ridiculous, but it’s also somewhat interesting. In some of my projects I don’t even add a switch. This actually seems very common in “maker” projects. Why add a switch when you can just apply and cut power by plugging a thing in!? So why not make the switch the BIG THING in the project. Many times larger than the batteries and the thing you’re actually turning on. Hell, it’s almost art!

Because the switch sounds so amazing, I had to make a video. Oh, also you can see the LED turn on, so there’s no trickery in this video.

Also, worse case, if I keep this thing around I’ll have a nice big high voltage rated switch I can cannibalize for another project. So that’s a big win in my book.

(Oh, sorry about the terrible photos of the blue LED. I need to do better next time.)

« Older Entries |


buy the button:

Buy The Button