posts tagged with the keyword ‘firefox’

2012.08.16

Make Blog

I’m a fan of the Make Blog, and I’m also a user of a 13″ MacBook Pro, and those two things conflict a little bit.

Just take a look at the screen shot above, it’s what I see with a maximized browser window…

Make Blog

I prefer this view, where the footer is hidden, because 98% of the time I’m on the Make site, I don’t need to know whatever the footer has to tell me, and since the footer is locked in place when you scroll, that’s 22 pixels that are always blocking the content. (On an 800 pixel high screen, even losing 22 pixels can hurt.)

I’m using Mozilla Firefox with the Stylish Plugin to do this.

And here’s the code:

@namespace url(http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml);

@-moz-document domain("blog.makezine.com")
{
        div.new-footer {
                display: none !important;
        }

}

You can do a lot more with Stylish, as it lets you edit any CSS that gets loaded into your browser. Check out userstyles.org for more examples, but if you’re handy with CSS you can write your own little snippets like this for all the web sites that you’d like to improve upon in your daily browsing.

2011.12.22

View Source

Remember when I said Chrome was annoying (and probably hinted they were evil) because they hid the ‘view source’ command?

Welcome to evil Firefox!

And yeah, Firefox also hides the protocol in the latest versions. Luckily it’s fairly easy to unhide it.

Still, I’m not a fan of the layer of chrome being applied to Firefox.

2011.08.23

Adopt Mozilla

One more than one occasion, people have asked why I don’t use Google Chrome, or Apple’s Safari, or even Opera or Microsoft Internet Explorer… I think this sums it up pretty well:

Mozilla’s mission is to build user sovereignty into the fabric of the Internet. We work to ensure that the the Internet remains open, interoperable and accessible to all. To do this we build products, we build decentralized participation worldwide, and we build the ability for people to create their own experiences in addition to consuming commercial offerings.

As the “web” changes, I think it’s probably necessary for Mozilla to change as well.

Read the whole thing: Mozilla in the New Internet Era – More Than the Browser.

2011.07.27

Not Just Yet...

I happened to visit the Chrome Web Store using Firefox, and I was greeted with the following message:

Sorry, we don’t support your browser just yet. You’ll need Google Chrome to install apps, extensions and themes.

Wait… I was using Mozilla Firefox to visit the Chrome Web Store, so why am I posting this?

Because Google has given me hope. See, they said “we don’t support your browser just yet” and with that “just yet” part, I’m going to assume that they will support my browser at some point in the future.

I plan to revisit this post every few months to see if the status has changed.

2011.04.22

TenFourFox

I know all the hep cats out there have the latest Intel MacBooks to write their Ruby code on, but you would do well to remember that there are still a lot of useful PowerPC-based PowerMacs out there, being used daily for general purpose computing. These machines were the powerhouses of yesteryear at many a creative agency, and a lot of them have big drives, plenty of RAM, and are still running. They get passed down to folks who aren’t running any heavy apps like Photoshop, InDesign, or Final Cut Pro.

And dammit, I want those people to be able to browse the web in a reasonably modern fashion.

TenFourFox may be the best option now that Firefox 4 is out and has abandoned the PowerPC architecture.

TenFourFox - PowerPC 4 Ever!

Here’s some words worth reading:

If there’s one thing we’ve learned from our years of using Macs, it’s that they outlast anything else out there. Why shouldn’t an iBook be able to look at embarrassing pictures on Facebook, or Twitter about our lunch break? These are our computers, dang it. We paid good money for them. They still work. There’s no technical reason they can’t do everything that a MacBook can. So if you want something done, you do it yourself, and we did. The result is TenFourFox.

You’ve still got do deal with things like older versions of Flash (yuck) and QuickTime. I mean, everyone is abandoning PowerPC-based Macs, and it’s only a matter of time, but TenFourFox buys you some time, just like WaMCom bought us some time back in the old days… I’ve always thankful for the people behind these projects. They take on work that the so-called “official” software developers won’t, or can’t. I know there’s only so many hours in the day, and developer time has to be focused, but still… it’s always a shame to see working technology abandoned.

Anyway, TenFourFox is now on two machines, and I’ll put it on more if I need to, and let you know how it goes…

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