posts tagged with the keyword ‘oshpark’

2016.11.27

ATtinyNoisy

I needed some small boards to put an ATtiny85 on, so I drew up a simple board in Fritzing and had them made up at OSH Park.

ATtinyNoisy

Here’s the breadboard view in Fritzing. Whenever I need “holes” to solder random components into I just use screw terminals. I’m sure there’s another/better way, but I’ve not found it yet, so I keep doing it this way.

ATtinyNoisy

Once the breadboard view is done, I go to the PCB view and move things around, make all the connections, and then export the files in Gerber format. Once you have a folder of Gerber files, you can ZIP it up and then upload to OSH Park for fabrication. (I covered this process in a previous post.)

MCN Gerber Viewer

I did find this Mac OS X application called MCN Gerber Viewer which allows you to view Gerber files. You can view the different “layers” and turn them on and off to check your board before fabrication. OSH Park shows you what your board will look like when you upload it, so you can easily check for issues, but MCN Gerber Viewer is still handy to have around to check files before you upload them.

You can download ATtinyNoisy, which includes the Fritzing file and the Gerber files, or just order it from OSH Park.

2016.05.16

Teensy LC BOB v1.3

Good News, Everyone! The new Teensy LC break-out board is ready! Yes, we’re now at version 1.3 of the Teensy LC BOB.

Preview

I’ve made a few changes since version 1.2. I moved the traces from the top to the bottom (how did I miss that!?) and I added an extra ground line so that you can connect a bunch of screw terminals to the ground row even if you don’t solder in header pins at the end of the board and only do the sides. (This also comes in handy if using the Teensy Audio Adaptor Board.)

I’ve also lengthened the board a bit, and added a fifth hole, and here’s why…

Installed

For a recent project I discovered that the USB cable was able to rip the USB connector right off the Teensy if hit, twisted, or yanked in the wrong direction. The fifth hole is for adding a piece (wood? plastic?) by screwing it into the bottom and then looping a zip tie around the USB cable for strain relief.

USB mock-up

I scanned in a Micro USB cable and placed it over an image of the board to figure out spacing. It should work. I may end up 3D modeling the piece that holds the USB cable in place.

As I use the boards more I may find other improvements along the way. Also, I’m now able to load in custom images and graphics onto the PCB, so I’m already scheming for my next OSH Park project.

2016.02.19

Teensy LC BOB v1.2

Woohoo! My new boards came in from OSH Park. The Teensy LC BOB v1.2 looks good! It’s purple, it has labels, it has places to put screw terminals and holes for mounting… There’s even a version number now.

Teensy LC on Perma-Proto Board

If you saw my previous post, I mentioned how I was doing things, which looked a bit like the photo above. There’s nothing wrong with this, but I wanted it a bit cleaner, hence the Teensy LC BOB PCB.

Teensy LC BOB v1.1

Here’s a photo of one of the v1.1 boards in an interactive museum exhibit. I had to drill the holes a bit larger to get it mounted, which is the reason the new version is v1.2.

I’m still not totally sure about the pin I labeled “17v” as it could be mistaken as “17 volts” but it’s really “pin 17 at Vin voltage”. This means the thing labeled “17v” will be whatever your input voltage is… and if you plan on using Neopixels, it should probably be 5 volts. I’ll assume users can read about the Teensy LC and figure it out.

OSH Park

And hey, you can order this PCB now! Get it from OSH Park. It’s shared publicly on the site. There doesn’t seem to be a way to set a license on OSH Park, but I’d consider it Open Source Hardware. If I had known how to add the OSHW logo, I would have. (Of course the Teensy itself is not open-source, but hey, not everything can be. It is a great piece of hardware, though!)

Note: The needed screw terminals are 2.53mm pitch, so these or these will work.

2016.02.14

Teensy BOB v1.0

I recently created my first “real” printed circuit board. By “real” I mean one that I sent out to get fabricated, not one I did at home by etching it myself. The board is for a Teensy LC, and breaks out most of the pins to screw terminals. (Pictured above is version 1.0, which has been revised due to a few spacing issues and the mounting holes being too small. You can see I had to drill them a bit larger.)

Teensy Proto

The Teensy LC BOB (BreakOut Board) came about due to my use of the Teensy for a few museum projects that were using the controller as an input device for a computer. I had been putting the boards onto Adafruit Perma-Proto Breadboards which are great to work with, but after building a few of these that were very similar to each other, I thought I could just design my own PCB to get the job done. (The board I designed probably cost about $2.15 more than the Adafruit boards, but it’s also designed to be exactly what I need.)

Breadboard in Fritzing

I started by designing what I needed in Fritzing using the breadboard view. I added in the screw terminals I wanted, and wired it all up. At this point spacing doesn’t matter too much, as it’s just to get all the components and connections in place.

PCB in Fritzing

Once all the pieces are in place and connected up I switched to PCB view where you get to see what the actual printed circuit board will look like. Here the positioning and spacing is just like the real world. This step probably tool the most amount of time, and I found the tools a bit lacking compared to something like Inkscape or Illustrator for precise positioning. Part of this could be due to my still learning how it all works. There’s some good info here on designing PCBs in Fritzing. (Eventually I’d like to do custom shapes.)

Export Gerber

After I was happy with the PCB layout I exported it using Export > for Production > Extended Gerber (RS-274X) from the file menu.

Gerber Files

It will output a whole bunch of files to the folder specified. Once I had this folder I made a ZIP file from it, and named it Teensy-BOB.zip and uploaded it to OSH Park.

OSH Park

OSH Park’s web site will check your files and show you previews during the upload process. (Hopefully you can figure out what you’re looking at!) As I mentioned, the first version had a few issues, so I corrected those and put in a new order. For the new version I added the name of the board and the version number. Once I get these back and test them I’ll share the project so anyone can order some if needed. (At least one person at Milwaukee Makerspace was interested.)

I should note that the Teensy 3.x board could also be put on one of these, though the pin labeling is a little different. I’ll probably create another version that is specific to the Teensy 3.x for a future project I’m doing for Maker Faire Milwaukee this year.

Update: OSH Park has some docs on using Fritzing.

Update: Download the TeensyBOB Fritzing file!

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