posts tagged with the keyword ‘twitter’

2011.06.21

Contemplating the Vortex

I keep hearing about how Facebook and Twitter are changing the way things are done. From drafting a constitution to fixing Summerfest, these “new” sites are making new things possible… sort of.

But really, this is nothing new as far as the web is concerned. A typical web site from 2002 could easily have solicited feedback on how to improve things within a country, or a festival, or your own home town. In fact, some did, but there were some crucial elements missing, including critical mass, and reputation.

Critical mass in that there’s more people online now, being more engaged, thanks to sites like Twitter and Facebook. For the typical non-nerdy type, Facebook is the simple way to be online and connect with friends, and family, and brands. Twitter is pretty similar nowadays, though maybe slight nerdier, and even that is debatable now.

When I talk about reputation, I’m talking about the fact that with Twitter, and Facebook, you very often have a well formulated idea of who someone is. It’s typically built by looking at what the person has to say, and to who, and who has things to say to them. Their reputation. Their identity.

In the olden days (1997-200?) reputation was often tied to your blog, where you did your talking and where people talked back to you. (I’m sure similar things could be said of forums, etc. but I’m not convinced it’s the same thing.) I know there have been anonymous bloggers, but if I look back at the people who were blogging at the same time I started, I knew those people, and I trusted those people. I read their blogs daily, and they read mine, and we commented on each others posts, and we had conversations. It may have been a fixed point in time which created this situation, and perhaps it is an illusion… I don’t know for sure.

But the point is, I think what Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Quora, and other sites have going for them nowadays is this element of trust and reputation they give to the users. These elements (should) allow a conversation to happen without the doubt that can often exist online, where you don’t know if a dog is a dog or a guy pretending to be a dog.

I’m still thinking through this whole idea… but would love some feedback on it.

2011.02.17

tapps posted something to Twitter, I replied and turned it into a joke, and it went a little crazy from there with some help from janiukjf and chernowa … Here’s the transaction. (I’ve saved it here since at some point it may will become unavailable on Twitter.)

Server Errors

As long as we’re on the subject, I thought I’d expand on the whole “Server Error” joke and attempt to come up with a restaurant/food/server joke for every HTTP code.

Informational 1xx – This is when your server introduces themselves to you.

100 Continue – This happens if you interrupt the server before they tell you the specials.

101 Switching Protocols – If the server realizes you are being difficult, stupid, or drunk, they may change the way they talk to you.

Successful 2xx – Hooray! You’ve managed to interact successfully with your server.

200 OK – Server is OK, hasn’t screwed anything up yet.

201 Created – You’ve decided what you wanted to order, and told the server.

202 Accepted – The server has accepted your order.

203 Non-Authoritative Information – If someone tells you that the burgers are good, find out who they heard it from. (Make sure it wasn’t Yelp.)

204 No Content – This is what happens when you are not content with your food.

205 Reset Content – This is what happens when you send the food back.

206 Partial Content – This is what happens when the server forgot something you ordered.

Redirection 3xx – This is what happens when the server starts coming towards your table, but turns and goes the other direction.

300 Multiple Choices – Typically, this will happen when they list the desserts… Choosing is quite difficult!

301 Moved Permanently – Occasionally you may want to move to another table, perhaps by the window, or the fireplace.

302 Found – Hooray! You thought you lost your server, but you found them.

303 See Other – This is what happens when you try to order from an employee who is not your server.

304 Not Modified – This is what happens when you send it back and then they return it without doing anything to it.

305 Use Proxy – This is when you have someone order for you, you know, if you have to go to the bathroom or something.

307 Temporary Redirect – This is when you make everyone else order before you because you haven’t decided yet.

Client Error 4xx – Oops! You’re the client, you’ve done something wrong… You probably pissed off your server.

400 Bad Request – Again, you screwed up. Did you try ordering a steak at a vegan restaurant?

401 Unauthorized – This is what happens if someone tries to order for you but you stop them.

402 Payment Required – Most restaurants rely on this one.

403 Forbidden – Asking your server for his/her phone number.

404 Not Found – Server is missing… probably on break.

405 Method Not Allowed – This is what happens if you try to order the kids meal when you’re a full grown adult.

406 Not Acceptable – If you get “grabby” with your server, well,that’s just not acceptable.

407 Proxy Authentication Required – If someone orders for you, and the server asks if it’s OK that they ordered for you…

408 Request Timeout – Server asks ” Do you need a little more time to decide?” Then leaves. (This is usually followed by a 404 error.)

409 Conflict – You really want the lobster, but you also really want the streak. Can’t have both!

410 Gone – Server has quit. Probably on a bus half way home already.

411 Length Required – This one is typically only used when ordering subs.

412 Precondition Failed – You may have ordered alcohol, but you’re not 21 yet. #fail

413 Request Entity Too Large – You know that 72 ounce steak that they give you, and if you eat the whole thing your meal is free? Don’t do it! It’s too large.

414 Request-URI Too Long – Occasionally someone will try to order everything on the menu…

415 Unsupported Media Type – Don’t try ordering your meal by singing.

416 Requested Range Not Satisfiable – You want free range beef. They don’t have it.

417 Expectation Failed – Your meal sucked.

Server Error 5xx – Server screwed up. It happens. (Go tell Yelp.)

500 Internal Server Error – Occasionally your server will be having emotional problems. Perhaps he (or she) is in love with two people at the same time…

501 Not Implemented – Not everything comes deep-fried and/or covered in cheese.

502 Bad Gateway – Typically an error between the server and the kitchen.

503 Service Unavailable – Server is not serving. See 404 and 410.

504 Gateway Timeout – This happens when the server gets too busy to relay your order to the kitchen.

505 HTTP Version Not Supported – Usually this only happens with older browsers. (Senior citizens who don’t know what to order. Or where they are. Or what year it is.)

Whew! Never let it be that I don’t know when to quit… because really, I don’t. END OF FILE

2011.01.27

Reply

In the olden days of blogging, before there were comments, if someone blogged about something and you wanted to reply publicly, your option was to post something on your own blog.

All of us early bloggers had blogs, so, you know, that made some sense.

Eventually bloggers wanted to be able to have people comment on their posts, so blogging software added the ability to leave a comment. A grand idea! Collect all the comments in one place, attached to the blog post, and you can easily see the discussion. Heck, people could even leave a comment and link back to their own blog with an expanded post on the subject. This was before the days of link spamming and even rel=”nofollow” nonsense.

So as you see in the screenshot of the comment form, it wants your Name and your Email address. This is all good, accountability, identity, etc. There’s also a field for “Website” which made sense, right? All of us early bloggers had blogs.

I think many of us believed that some day everyone would have their own web site.

Having your own web site isn’t the equivalent of owning your own home. I think that used to be part of the “American Dream” if you ever bought into that sort of thing…

People are fine being sharecroppers, and if they want a “home” on the web, huge corporations like Twitter or Facebook are happy to rent them some space. If your landlords are cool, then it should all work out, but if things turn sour, well… Let’s just say it’s nice to have a place to call home.

2011.01.05

Blogging in the House!

On Anil’s piece titled If You Didn’t Blog It, It Didn’t Happen, I left the following comment:

Twitter is like going to a restaurant. Blogging is like buying a house.

I thought I should expand on that… and what better place than right here, on my own blog, where I’m allowed to.

As I’ve said before (in fact, I said it just yesterday) there are things I don’t like about Twitter, but my not liking these things, or complaining about them probably isn’t going to change them. That’s OK… I don’t own Twitter, I don’t control Twitter, I just visit Twitter.

Twitter is like going to a restaurant. You can talk to people you know, and people you don’t know. They can talk to you. You can overhear conversations. You’re at the mercy of the management. They can kick you out.

Blogging is like buying a house. It requires maintenance and upkeep. You’re free to do what you want, you can redecorate, or hang some pictures, or ramble on as long as you want. It’s your home, you own it, and you make the rules.

Anyway, that’s how I see it. I’ve had this blog since 1997. I’ve been using Twitter since 2006. I can still get to every single blog post I’ve written here (and so can you) while Twitter only lets me see a portion of the content I’ve put into it. I’ve started archiving as much of it as I can over here… on my own site, because I don’t trust Twitter with my data the way I trust myself with my data.

2011.01.04

Dave has a nice post titled Things RSS can’t (and can) do which I assume is due to certain people declaring RSS to be “dead” or something equally as silly.

I’m going to add number 12 to his list:

12. RSS can’t block you.

While there are plenty of good things about Twitter, there are also things I don’t care for… Twitter is a centralized system, they aren’t open enough, blah, blah, blah… and worst of all, people can block you. I mean, that’s a good thing, right?

Blocked!

I’d like to be able to interact with Dave on Twitter, but I can’t because I am blocked. I don’t know if Dave blocked me on purpose (it’s possible!) or if there’s some Twitter-bit that got flipped and doesn’t allow me to follow him.

Keep in mind, I’ve known Dave online since about 1994, met him in 2000, and through the years and technologies such as blogging, RSS, podcasting, Frontier (and other stuff I probably can’t remember) we’ve communicated plenty. In fact, I’m “friends” with him on Facebook and Flickr, but on Twitter… I’m just “blocked.” Oh well…

But fear not… through the magic of “RSS” and “blogs” I’m still able to read what Dave says (on scripting.com) and reply to it on RasterWeb!… and I can even use more than 140 characters…

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