posts tagged with the keyword ‘3dprinting’

2016.12.30

USB Mount

I designed a small part to hold a panel mount USB cable. I started with the Phoenix Connector Mount I briefly mentioned before, and did some quick modifications to make it work with the USB cable.

USB Mount

I designed this thing in OpenSCAD though I did borrow a few elements from another recent model so that I could use 5/8″ #4 screws. The bottom where the screws go in is set to a height that allows the screws to go in just under 1/4″ which is enough to hold, but not enough to go through the material they’ll be screwed into. This is one of the things I love about making custom mounts and brackets, you can configure them to match the hardware you have available.

USB Mount

With many of the things that need (semi) precise placement of things, it takes two to three revisions to get it right. I actually used the second revision because I was in a hurry, but I’ve modified the file so version 3 will be just right next time. (I had the panel mount screw holes just a little too close together. Things flex enough that it works, but it could be better, and will be… next time.)

USB Mount

The first version actually warped quite a bit in printing. It’s a problem we seem to have occasionally with the old MakerBot. It’s always the front left corner of the print. I find that by shifting the print on the bed to the right just a bit often fixes the problem (at least for small prints.)

USB Mount

You can find this design on YouMagine and Thingiverse.

2016.05.27

Arduino Nano Holder

I made another boring 3D printed part, and I say that in the best possible way. I mean, in some ways we may be at the point where creating a custom part is a little boring.

For anyone who has access to a 3D printer the magic at first is having a machine that can make a thing. The next level of magic is being able to design a thing and then make that thing. (I’d add that making a thing repeatedly, in an automated fashion, and sharing the thing with others who can do the same, is another level of magic.)

Anyway, I needed a thing, so I did a search and found the thing, which is an Arduino Nano mounting base. I downloaded it, printed it, and it wasn’t quite what I needed, and didn’t print very well. No matter, I just designed my own.

Arduino Nano Holder

Here’s my Arduino Nano Holder. I designed it very quickly, printed it, and it was ok but not great, so I tweaked things a bit and printed again. The same afternoon I needed a thing, I had a thing. I then shared the design with others so they could have the thing. In the first two days it was online 14 people found it useful and/or interesting.

I think that people forget that half the magic is in the physical making of the thing, and the other half is in the “virtual” making of the thing. Designing the thing with software. This is part of the problem that the “I’ve got a 3D printer, what do I do with it now?” presents.

Plenty of organizations are getting 3D printers with no clear plan of how they will be used. They are magical machines, but magic requires a wizard, or whatever you want to call someone with the skills to design 3D objects. And yes, the software is getting better/easier, so there is hope.

I may need to design another part next week, and it probably won’t be amazing or spectacular, but it will get the job done, and getting the job done is more important to me than magic.

2015.12.28

Shim

I needed a few shims to make something fit just right and I grabbed a piece of 3mm acrylic that was sitting on my desk, figuring I could easily cut it in the shop, but 3mm was just too thick. I could have tried to sand it down to the proper thickness, but at this point I would have had to cut three shims to the proper size, and get them all down to the correct thickness. (I didn’t want to use wood, as something would be sliding against the shim, and wood wasn’t the best choice.)

OpenSCAD

I took some measurements with digital calipers, launched OpenSCAD, typed in the dimensions, and had a 3D object ready to be 3D printed in just a few minutes. While I did have to wait for the 3D printer to heat up, and print the pieces, I could easily do other work while I was waiting for the prints. I didn’t spend time cutting and sanding things to get them the exact size.

Sometimes 3D printing is the right answer, and sometimes 3D printing doesn’t have to be revolutionary or solve big problems, sometimes it can solve the (little) problem you have, quickly and easily, and that’s enough.

2015.12.11

Because when you’ve got a 3D printer… You might as well print things…

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

3D Printing

Also… OpenSCAD.

2015.08.19

Phoenix Connector Mount

Years ago my grandfather had shop in the basement, and he made things. He made doll furniture, and (wooden) snow shoes, and household items, and of course, lots of sawdust. My dad also had a work shop, and made many of the same things, and also made full-size furniture for our house. They both invested in tools over the years to make things.

I don’t think anyone ever said to them “You’ve got all these tools, and this great work shop, and you make doll furniture!?”

If you’re a Maker (and they both were) sometimes the joy is in the making… in the process… but it can also be the joy that comes from giving a gift to someone that you made yourself.

Phoenix Connector Mount

I like making things as well. Sometimes I just use my hands and some tools and whatever raw materials are on hand, but I also really like designing things using software that can then be fabricated by machines. I don’t consider this any less “making”, by the way.

I think I enjoy designing useful things in the same way I used to enjoy writing code. There was a problem to be solved, and if I could do it, or help do it, I would… and if solving a problem once for yourself can solve it for others in the future, even better. Most people agree that it doesn’t make sense to solve a problem that’s already been solved.

Phoenix Connector Mount

During a recent project someone needed to mount this Phoenix Connector to something, and a piece of Aluminum was found, and a square(ish) hole was made, and some holes were drilled, and there was probably some filing involved, but in the end, it worked, and that’s fine.

In my mind though, this was a problem that could be solved by designing and fabricating a part. Now, if this was a one-off, it might not matter as much, but if we build another one of these things, or use these connectors again, why spend time cutting and drilling and filing a piece of metal when we’ve got a 3D Printer in the shop?

Phoenix Connector Mount

To me, the promise of digital fabrication isn’t always about doing it the fastest, or the cheapest, but it’s about precision and repeatability. If Bob down in the shop can crank out a mount in 10 minutes, and it’s good enough, that’s great. But if Ted, and Laura, and Tim can take a file that I designed, and spit one out with a 3D Printer on a whim, and it’s the same every single time, that’s valuable. The knowledge and skill needed to create something is shared and distributed. Long after Bob and Ted and Laura and Tim leave the shop, someone could still make the thing, multiple times, precisely, because the problem was solved long ago.

I’m not dismissing hands-on making skills, or in any way suggesting digital fabrication is always a better choice, but in some cases, I think that if applied properly it can make things… better.

You can find Phoenix Connector Mount on Thingiverse and Youmagine.

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